Wantima

Subtitle

Kallangur

Kallangur Aboriginal History

Kallangur place name


Kallangur’s name has two references to its origin, from the Kabi language Kaľang-ngũr, adv. goodly, satisfactory (Watson: pg. 29) or Kal-lang-ur, good (Maroochy dialect) (Petrie: pg. 323).  Kallangur name and boundaries were gazetted by the Minister for Survey on the 17th November 1979, on page 1167, plan number QPN150.

It is also good to remember that locations had different names in different dialects: Caboolture was Kabul-tur in Turrabal and Wongadum in Kabi, Sandgate was Moora in Turrbal and Warrah in Jandai. 
The Brisbane traditional owners are known as the Turrbal people.  There are a variety of clan groups.


Kallangur is marked as being the “North Pine Clan” of the Turrabal.  The neighbouring clan should also be taken into consideration due to their close vicinity, the “Ningy-Ningy Clan”, from the Kabi (Gubbi Gubbi language) people

 

Aboriginal Pathways (J.C. Steele)

Kallangur place name

 

Kallangur’s name has two references to its origin, from the Kabi language Kaľang-ngũr, adv. goodly, satisfactory (Watson: pg. 29) or Kal-lang-ur, good (Maroochy dialect) (Petrie: pg. 323).  Kallangur name and boundaries were gazetted by the Minister for Survey on the 17th November 1979, on page 1167, plan number QPN150.

 

It is also good to remember that locations had different names in different dialects: Caboolture was Kabul-tur in Turrabal and Wongadum in Kabi, Sandgate was Moora in Turrbal and Warrah in Jandai. 

The North Pine Clan

The early indigenous inhabitants of the Pine Rivers district were of the Turrbul language group. The Turrbul, sometimes referred to the Brisbane Tribe extended from about Logan River in the south, Moggill in the west and Pine River in the north. The coastal strip belonged to the Ninge-Ninge clan from the Kabi group and to the west in the foothills of the D'Aguilar Range were the Garumungar. Numerous clans or groups centred their lives around various locations within Turrbul country as evidenced by numerous Bora Rings that were observed in the early days of white settlement. The Turrbul seemed to be largely river people whose favourite camps and ceremonial grounds were adjacent to their main food source, the rivers.


The North Pine Clan who ranged on the northern edges of Turrbul country and centred their lives on the North Pine River around what is now Petrie (North Pine). Numbering about two hundred at the time of the arrival of the settlers, the clan exploited the Pine River and the surrounding area for its livelihood. Journeys into the Blackall Range or further to coincide with the Bunya nut season were a no doubt relished event which kept them away for weeks at a time. Similar journeys to the coast for Dugong or shellfish were also part of the clan's cycle of hunting and gathering food.


It is no coincidence that Petrie (North Pine) was an important aboriginal site. Tom Petrie grew up with aboriginal children in and around Brisbane. He learned their language and spent a significant amount of time with them on journeys to the mountains for Bunya nuts and fishing trips. His status with the local indigenous population gave him favour and privilege within their culture that other white men could not appreciate. When in 1859 Tom Petrie took up property at North Pine his selection may have been influenced by his position with the Turrbul people. In any case, Tom Petrie's Murrumba was established on the land belonging to the North Pine Clan or the Whiteside Cattle Run depending on which way  you look at it.


Murrumba was only two kilometres from the Old Northern Road which may have been in the first instance a traditional track north for the clans. Nindur-Ngineddo, the North Pine Clan's Bora Ring is located more or les under the traffic roundabout in Petrie. The small ring is on top of Petrie Hill about a kilometre away at the end of the path which heads north east form Nindur-Ngineddo. John Oxley as far back as 1823 reported seeing a 'weir' of bushes blocking an inlet on the Pine River. This fishing hole called Mandin can be seen at the end of Mundin St. Petrie. The 'weir' was effectively a fish trap where fish, mostly mullet or whiting,  were driven in to Mandin to be harvested. The Rain Making Site just a little further up river, along with Mandin and Nindur-Ngineddo belonged to Dalaipi the rain maker.


http://pineriversshs.eq.edu.au/pages/school/history/north_pine_clan.htm

 

 

Aboriginal Place Names


Other place-names in Petrie area whose meaning are known are:

NAME    MEANING    LOCATION
Berrimpa    present place    a spring at Petrie
Bungil    grass    a pocket at Petrie
Dakabin    grass – trees    Suburb
Kulukan or Gooloogan    pelican    north side of mouth of Pine River
Mudlo-Mudlo     stone    big hill near Petrie’s Pocket
Narangba    small place    Suburb
Tungulba    fish-poison place    Hay’s Inet
Yibri    put it down    Yebri Creek
Yimbun     bulrush    former lagoon on Yebri Creek just east of Redcliffe Road.

Aboriginal Pathways (J.C. Steele : pages 129 – 131)

Beerwah (Kabi) , meaning “up in the sky,” from bir’ra, the sky, and wa, an abbreviation of wan’dum, to go up: to climb; rising up.

Caboolture (Yugarabul) meaning “place of carpet snakes” from Kabul, carpet snake, and dha, place.  On a map, published by Lang in 1848, the name was applied to the bay at the mouth of the river, and the river is recorded as Cuthbertson’s creek.
Murrumba (Yugarabul) , a. good.

Vocabularies of Four Representative Tribes of South East Qld (Watson)

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