Wantima

Subtitle

mission

A-B

Aurukun
Aitkenvale see Townsville
Bamaga
Barambah (Cherbourg)
Batavia River
Bellenden Ker
Bellenden Plains
Bethesda (Beenleigh)
Birdsville
Bloomfield River Mission -
Boggy Creek Run (Laura River)
Bogimbah Creek - see Fraser Island
Boulia
Bowen
Box Hill Runs - see Georgetown
Bribie Island
Brisbane - Aboriginal Girls Home
Bunya Country
Burketown

C

Cairns
Camooweal
Cape Bedford
Cape Grafton
Cape York Settlement
Charters Towers
Cherbourg
Chillagoe
Cloncurry
Coen
Collinsville
Cooktown
Cowal Creek
Croydon

D-E

Daintree River Mission
Dajarra
Dalby
Deebing Creek
Doomadgee
Durundur
Edward River
Elim - see Hopevale
Embley River
Eulo

F-G

Fantome Island
Fitzroy Island
Foleyvale
Fraser Island
Gayndah
Georgetown
Gorge Mission (Mossman)
Gregory Downs

H-K

Halifax Bay
Herberton
Hinchinbrook Island
Hopevale (Cape Bedford)
Hughenden
Hull River
Injinoo
Kowanyama (Mitchell River Mission)

L-M

Laura
Laura River - see Boggy Creek Run
Lockhart River
Lloyd Bay
Mackay
Mapoon
Mareeba
Marie Yamba
Mitchel (East)
Mitchell River
Mona Mona
Moreton Bay
Mornington Island
Mount Carbine
Mount Garnet
Mount Isa
Myora

N-Q

Nerang
New Castle Bay (Cape York Peninsula)
Noosa
Normanton
Palm Island
Pascoe River
Pormpuraaw (Edward River)
Purga
Queerah Aboriginal Mission

R-T

Ravenshoe
Rocky Island
Seisia
Small River
Somerset
South Brisbane
Stradbroke Island (Myora)
Stuart Creek
Sweers Island
Taroom
Townsville
Traubanaman
Tully River

U-Z

Umagico
Weipa
Wellesley Islands
Whitula Station
Woorabinda
Wujal Wujal
Yarrabah (Cape Grafton)
Yungaburra
Zamia Creek
Zion Hill

Queensland Missions

Missions were first started as a means of controlling the original owners of the land by restricting their movements and making it easier for white settlers to move in and take over.  As more and more settlers moved into Australia, more missions were set up until there were missions right across Australia.  These missions were often places where Aboriginal people lost almost all of their cultural heritage and human rights.

Encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia

 

Europeans were unable to recognise Aboriginal society and culture for what they were.  Usurpation of land destroyed not only the economic and ecological basis of traditional society, but also the religious core. At the end of the nineteenth century the government created legislation to combat the affects of whites on Aboriginals. This was done by placing Aboriginal people on Missions or Reserves.



“Archibald Meston’s report (Protection and Restriction of the Sale of Opium Act of 1897) was strongly paternalistic.  There was little serious consideration given by him, or anyone else, to any solution other than to remove Aborigines to reserves.  Although Meston was most critical of the missions in the Cape York Peninsula, his policy was basically similar to the missionaries’ :  Aborigines were to be protected from the vices of civilisation by excluding them from towns, controlling employment and restricting the supply of opium.  Meston also recommended the abolition of the notorious Native Police Force, which was also “damned by its own most senior officer” (Rowley, 1972a, 181)  in an 1897 report by W.E. Parry-Okeden, the new Police Commissioner.  But the Latter’s advice, that the force should be retained with an emphasis on deterrence and reconciliation, was followed in the 1897 legislation.”


Gerard Guthrie, 1997?, page 7



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